Building the Security Operations Center (SOC)


Whether defending against common malware or some determined Nation State, being able to proactively detect attacks and changes in the organization are required.  The past year I spent a large amount of time helping several organizations setup and put in place the right people, processes, and technology to help defend against increasing security threats.  Although many organizations spend millions of dollars on technology and hire staff to monitor security 24/7 the organizations were still lacking two fundamental items.

  1. The people although good at monitoring lacked the attack and threat mind set.  The staff was not able to figure out when an actual attack was happening.
  2. Second the organizations lacked the basic security operations processes required to keep track and make appropriate use of the vast amounts of data.

As a result I spent the past few months developing a whitepaper that specifically addresses the primary components of a SOC, which can be used to help organizations setup a centralized core and embark on developing the correct operational processes.  Although I don’t address item number one above, this paper explains in detail the following.

  • Defining the SOC
  • Determining the Processes
  • Understanding the Environment that needs protected
  • Identifying the SOC Customers
  • Staffing the SOC
  • Managing the Events
  • Leveraging ITIL compliance

Creating and Maintaining a SOC – The details behind successful Security Operations Centers

If your organization is under attack and you have invested in more people and technology be sure to implement the right processes and build a foundation for future defense.

Advertisements

Get Your Daily Security Feed


There has been a large amount of security information and recent attacks posted in the media.  We have Mandiant’s report on China as well as several issues concerning Java.  The pure volume of information over the past year has made it difficult to keep up without a combination sources.  As a result InfoSecAlways has done a few modifications to the site.  Please check out the new “Security Feeds” in the right column (4th Block Down).  This is a combination of about 20 different security RSS feeds piping into the blog now.  You can check the site daily to get the latest news and updates in the industry.

Also, check out the links page as there are several new Threat and Vulnerability links added.  These are great if you are looking for specific attacks, breaches, or threats.

To Trust or Not to Trust


Over the past three weeks an ongoing LinkedIn thread titled “Shall we trust our employees or not?” has continued to be a hot topic of debate. There simply appears to be no agreement among all the contributors.  Trust is relative.  You can always trust an employee or an organization, but the key is to what extent. You can also always trust that particular characteristics or actions will be repeated by each entity.  For example, some employees will always keep a secret while others will always tell at least one other person.  Therefore, you can trust one person to keep a secret and you can also trust the other person to tell your secret.  Simply put its a matter of behavior and action over time that should be used to build the trust model.

When referring to trust among organizations Section 2.6.1 Establishing Trust Among Organizations in NIST SP800-39 provides the best explanation.

Parties enter into trust relationships based on mission and business needs. Trust among parties typically exists along a continuum with varying degrees of trust achieved based on a number of factors. Organizations can still share information and obtain information technology services even if their trust relationship falls short of complete trust. The degree of trust required for organizations to establish partnerships can vary widely based on many factors including the organizations involved and the specifics of the situation (e.g., the missions, goals, and objectives of the potential partners, the criticality/sensitivity of activities involved in the partnership, the risk tolerance of the organizations participating in the partnership, and the historical relationship among the participants). Finally, the degree of trust among entities is not a static quality but can vary over time as circumstances change.

 

Disaster Recovery Distance – Gasoline and Hurricane Sandy


Almost one week after the hurricane Sandy disaster and this is the scene within at least a 50 mile radius north of Manhattan.  New Jersey which was hit harder is probably much worse considering gas rationing is now in effect.

December 2007 Posting

On December 19th, of 2007 InfoSecAlways posted a blog article on Disaster Recovery Alternate Site Distances.   In that posting was sited the recommended distance in preparing for a hurricane.  The external study suggested an 85 mile radius.  InfoSecAlways suggested increasing that distance to 210 miles.  If Sandy was only a category 1 hurricane and the Tri-state area is affected as far north as Bridgeport CT the 85 mile is absolutely not acceptable.  Even gas is hard to get within that 85 mile radius.

One item that was not discussed in the previous blog article was gasoline.  For the past 4 days now this is the same picture everywhere at least 50 miles north of Manhattan.  This station in particular has had a gas tank delivery every day for the past 3 days.  Each night the station runs out of gas late in the evening.  In New Jersey and Staten Island there are stories about gas being siphoned from tanks and generators being stolen.  The situation appears to get worse daily and the lines even longer.

A gasoline crisis affects both individuals and corporations.  Employees will not show up to work out of fear of theft or running out of gas.  This is especially true if they have power issues that require a generator.  Individuals will be forced to deal with personal items and work becomes secondary.   If a business operates as a supply chain, taxi, or delivery organization, which is dependent on transportation, it may be very difficult to operate due to lack of gas or increased traffic as a result of lines.

What to do?

Unfortunately gas is an absolute requirement for both individuals and corporations to operate effectively.  Individuals should know several different items that can help in the event of a disaster.

Siphoning gas is difficult on most new cars.  These cars contain a siphon screen that prevents hoses from going into the tank.  In dire situations removing the fuel filter allows access to the gas.  Remember lawn mowers and other house hold items may have gas if needed.

Generators and gas tanks will get stolen.  Staying is a disaster zone is not recommended even within a few days after the disaster.  Wait at the alternate location for several days until power is restored, supply chains can provide food, and any other immediate crisis has been resolved.

On the other hand corporations will need to provide an alternate means of connectivity for office and technology based jobs.  Use a good mobile provider that can bring a generator to the corporate office or enable the business to connect at a remote location.  Organizations like Agility Recovery are experts at providing these services and other mobile solutions.

Corporations that require gasoline to operate the business should have conducted the proper analysis and considered the supply of gasoline a mission critical process.  As a result these businesses must purchase a series of large tanks and should consider owning their own gas stations with back up supply chains in place.  These gas supply tanks and stations must be protected with the proper physical security mechanisms such as anti-siphon devices on tanks and secure fencing perimeters around the gas stations.

Recommended Distance

Gas is a critical resource and the effects during a hurricane can be substantial since it is required for heat, food, transportation, and much more.  Based on hurricane Sandy the distance required to provide a solid gasoline supply chain is around a 100 mile radius from the center point of the storm.  Both employees and corporations need to consider the type of disaster and its radius.  The radius should be considered for all resources and the supply chain for those resources.  Otherwise things may come to a halt when there is no gas left to buy at the station.

Security Conference List – Wikipedia Rocks


Wikipedia truly is amazing.  Check out the list of worldwide security conferences.  This is a great place to look for any professionals wanting to speak or attend high profile conferences.  Definitely a good site to add to my links page.

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_security_conference